Thick, Thin, Curvy, Sleek

Thick, Thin, Curvy, Sleek

Giving sex a graphic and typographic identity was spurred by the mass production of pornographic books, films and magazines throughout the 1960's. The most notable documentation of this new language was in the Eros, Avant Garde and Fact (1962-1971) magazines as well as the pornographic movie posters of Times Square. Eros, in particular, gave a voice to the sexual liberation of the 1960's with a very specific art direction and graphic point of view.  The look of these magazines and films became shorthand not only for sex but also feminism, freedom of speech, and body positivity.

 The highbrow erotic publications of Ralph Ginzburg (Eros, Avant Garde and Fact: magazine) featuring art direction by legendary typographer Herb Lubalin

The highbrow erotic publications of Ralph Ginzburg (Eros, Avant Garde and Fact: magazine) featuring art direction by legendary typographer Herb Lubalin

 A collection of pulp film posters from the 1970s. 

A collection of pulp film posters from the 1970s. 

The expressive thick and thin letters of Herb Lublin and the slick reductive super flat pop art of Tom Wesselmann continue to have a ubiquitous hold on the public consciousness. Contemporary films, book, organizations, sex toys, and publications pay homage to the style to communicate an air of “intellectual” and “progressive” sex.

 The explicit super flat pop art of Tom Wesselmann

The explicit super flat pop art of Tom Wesselmann

 An overview of contemporary homage to the erotic design of the 1970s

An overview of contemporary homage to the erotic design of the 1970s

The Old, New Way to Well Issue

The Old, New Way to Well Issue

Sex at the Museum

Sex at the Museum